Harmonic Music Forever

A musical saga of human Evolution, and search for the rhythms of Life. Mix a  synthesiser with harmonium, crystal and Tibetan bowls,  mini saxophone, vocals and effects. Add inner space, a dash of mystery and you’lll have a cosmic ode to eternity on which to hum along for a drug-free ecstatic insight.

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For physical CDs of other albums, go to Ariel's catalog.

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CD and Digital:

  1. Eternalia 15:21, Illustrative musical saga of human evolution and search for the rhythms of Life

  2. Harmonics of Light, 5:35, Mix a harmonium with crystal bowls, synthesiser and effects. Add space…

  3. Encounter Loop, 3:18, Inner Space remains a mystery: I did not know I would meet you there!

  4.  Astral Contact, 15:03, A cosmic music ode to eternity – try long notes humming along …

Ariel Kalma: composition, recording.
Remastered with the technical knowledge of Kamal Engel @ Art of Audio, Byron Bay.
Itamar Faitlowicz: cover art

© ℗ 2017 – All rights reserved Ariel Kalma  ♪ ♥ ♫



Review by SPECTRUM CULTURE, Daniel Bromfield, February 2018


Eternalia has a way of centering itself—like a laser beam straight through the center of the head.

A lotus flower, a babbling brook and a palatial arch ensconced in light are things we see pretty often on new age album covers. A skeleton isn’t, and the one on the cover of Ariel Kalma’s Eternalia seems to beckon us into the depths of one of the headiest and most enjoyable new albums from the old guard of new age—an album to be mentioned in the same breath as Laraaji’s Bring on the Sun/Sun Gong and Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith & Suzanne Ciani’s Sunergy.

Kalma is a French-born, Australia-based new age musician who’s been recording since the early 1970s. Despite being the subject of An Evolutionary Music, a wonderful 2014 compilation from RVNG Intl., he’s been largely passed over in the new age revival. Blame the fact that most of his music wasn’t available for years; blame the massive Bandcamp dump that made it accessible to the masses but not in chronological or even remotely coherent order. He’s obscure, and Eternalia probably won’t change this. It should.

Kalma’s voluminous Bandcamp describes Eternalia as a “saga,” giving listeners detailed descriptions on how to approach it. He recommends humming along. He also advises listeners to go in drug-free, which might sink the hearts of some listeners hoping for a psychedelic experience. Whether you follow Kalma’s word in listening to the album depends on how much you buy into his new-age philosophy—this is not an album that makes concessions for the jean-jacket crowd—but its structure as an album in the classic-rock sense means it flows seamlessly and has a clear beginning and end.

Full review here ...