My Albums
An intergenerational collaboration:
Vinyl LPs
from the 70s/80s
 
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Review

Ariel Kalma is the kind of musician that collectors live their lives to find at the bottom of a dollar record bin, and the kind who fellow musicians hope to become. He is a composer who worked on the periphery of a fringe movement, whose early adherents have recently seen an explosion in popularity...

- Vivian Hua, redefinemag.com

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Ascend Descend

Space Music

Around 1982 I had a portable recording system to create environments for self-development groups. They were inspirations to create sound healing, trance and relaxation journeys…

Ariel learned a lot how to generate big sounds with small equipment!

This was entirely recorded with a Yamaha PS-30 Portasound, Wasp synthesiser, microphone and effect pedals, on a 4 track cassette recorder.

Digitalised and remastered 2016 with the help and technical knowledge of Kamal M. Engels @ artofaudio.com.au

Download individual tracks or the full album

Use the controls on the left to listen to each track or to all of them continuously.

Click buy to buy the album or any track(s) in 320k MP3, FLAC, or just about any other format you could possibly desire. This will include the artwork booklet (cover art) in PDF!

Other downloads:

 

 

 

 

Available only as Download.

For CDs of other albums, go to Ariel's catalog.


 

Tracks:

1.       Entrance K7, 18:57 - Developed in the 70’s as a way to focus at the start of concerts. Counting is the key and the fingers must follow the mind… after second time it is easier to relax, improvise!

2.       Tundra Trou Noir, 24:40 – Ode to space and the infinite… With little equipment one has to be creative with effects, delays, echoes, reinjections, and avoiding over driving them all!

3.       White Space, 2:10 – White noise has all frequency equals. This is a coloured stellar version.

4.       Space Morse 2, 2:10 – Sending a message to the other side of the Milky Way …

5.       Slow Space Rumba, 12:52 – Who would have known this music could dance the universe?